Category: Tiffany Aching

Regular

discworldtour:

“This I choose to do,” she croaked, her breath leaving little clouds in the air. She cleared her throat and started again. “This I choose to do. If there is a price, this I choose to pay. If it is my death, then I choose to die. Where this takes me, there I choose to go. I choose. This I choose to do.”
It wasn’t a spell, except in her own head, but if you couldn’t make spells work in your own head, you couldn’t make them work at all.

– this I choose to do |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

His family had ruled the Chalk for a few hundr…

His family had ruled the Chalk for a few hundred years and had pieces of paper to prove it. There was nothing to prove when the first Aching had set foot on the Chalk; no one had invented paper then.

luluca-ilustracion:

luluca-ilustracion:

I read and reread many Tiffany Aching books this year… this drawing would be for Winthersmith

luluca-ilustracion:

luluca-ilustracion:

I read and reread many Tiffany Aching books this year… this drawing would be for Winthersmith

Pratchett quote

sewickedthread:

“And Tiffany knew that if a witch started thinking of anyone as “just” anything, that would be the first step on a well-worn path that could lead to, oh, to poisoned apples, spinning wheels, and a too-small stove… and to pain, and terror, and horror and the darkness.”
― Terry Pratchett, The Shepherd’s Crown

Regular

discworldtour:

The two-man band struck up. The men, in two lines of three facing each other, counted the beat and then leaped… Tiffany turned to Granny as twelve hobnailed boots crashed to the ground, throwing up sparks.
“Tell me how to take away pain,” she said, above the noise of the dance.
Crash!
“It’s hard,” said Granny, not taking her eyes off the dancers. Crash went the boots again.
“You can move it out of the body?”
Crash! 
“Sometimes. Or hide it. Or make a cage for it and carry it away. And all of it’s dangerous, and it will kill you if you don’t respect it, young woman. It is all price and no profit. You are asking me to tell you how to put your hand in the lion’s mouth.”
Crash!
“I must know, to help the Baron. It’s bad. There is a lot I have to do.”
“This you choose to do?” said Granny, still watching.
“Yes!”
Crash!
“This is your Baron who doesn’t like witches?” said Granny, her gaze going from face to face in the crowd.
“But who does like witches until they need one, Mistress Weatherwax?” said Tiffany sweetly.
Crash!
“This is a reckoning, Mistress Weatherwax,” Tiffany added. After all, once you’ve kissed the Wintersmith, you’re in the mood to dare. And Granny Weatherwax smiled, as if she’d done all that was expected of her.

– a new season, another reckoning |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

The two-man band struck up. The men, in two lines of three facing each other, counted the beat and then leaped… Tiffany turned to Granny as twelve hobnailed boots crashed to the ground, throwing up sparks.
“Tell me how to take away pain,” she said, above the noise of the dance.
Crash!
“It’s hard,” said Granny, not taking her eyes off the dancers. Crash went the boots again.
“You can move it out of the body?”
Crash! 
“Sometimes. Or hide it. Or make a cage for it and carry it away. And all of it’s dangerous, and it will kill you if you don’t respect it, young woman. It is all price and no profit. You are asking me to tell you how to put your hand in the lion’s mouth.”
Crash!
“I must know, to help the Baron. It’s bad. There is a lot I have to do.”
“This you choose to do?” said Granny, still watching.
“Yes!”
Crash!
“This is your Baron who doesn’t like witches?” said Granny, her gaze going from face to face in the crowd.
“But who does like witches until they need one, Mistress Weatherwax?” said Tiffany sweetly.
Crash!
“This is a reckoning, Mistress Weatherwax,” Tiffany added. After all, once you’ve kissed the Wintersmith, you’re in the mood to dare. And Granny Weatherwax smiled, as if she’d done all that was expected of her.

– a new season, another reckoning |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

The two-man band struck up. The men, in two lines of three facing each other, counted the beat and then leaped… Tiffany turned to Granny as twelve hobnailed boots crashed to the ground, throwing up sparks.
“Tell me how to take away pain,” she said, above the noise of the dance.
Crash!
“It’s hard,” said Granny, not taking her eyes off the dancers. Crash went the boots again.
“You can move it out of the body?”
Crash! 
“Sometimes. Or hide it. Or make a cage for it and carry it away. And all of it’s dangerous, and it will kill you if you don’t respect it, young woman. It is all price and no profit. You are asking me to tell you how to put your hand in the lion’s mouth.”
Crash!
“I must know, to help the Baron. It’s bad. There is a lot I have to do.”
“This you choose to do?” said Granny, still watching.
“Yes!”
Crash!
“This is your Baron who doesn’t like witches?” said Granny, her gaze going from face to face in the crowd.
“But who does like witches until they need one, Mistress Weatherwax?” said Tiffany sweetly.
Crash!
“This is a reckoning, Mistress Weatherwax,” Tiffany added. After all, once you’ve kissed the Wintersmith, you’re in the mood to dare. And Granny Weatherwax smiled, as if she’d done all that was expected of her.

– a new season, another reckoning |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

First she visited Nanny Ogg, who had to be told everything. That saved some time, because once you’ve told Nanny Ogg, you’ve more or less told everyone else. When she heard exactly what Tiffany had done to the Wintersmith, she laughed and laughed.

– Nanny Ogg knows |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

“Winter is over. I know. I’ve seen it through. Where it took me, there I chose to go. I chose when I danced with the Wintersmith.”

– this I choose to do |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith