Category: quote

Regular

agardenandlibrary:

The sea is always powerful. So many people believe in it. But it seldom answers prayers.

Small Gods by Terry Pratchett

Regular

All this hasn’t happened yet. It might not happen at all. The future is always a bit wobbly. Any little thing, like the fall of a snowflake or the dropping of the wrong kind of spoon, can send it spinning off along a new path. Or perhaps not.

– on the future |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

“This I choose to do,” she croaked, her breath leaving little clouds in the air. She cleared her throat and started again. “This I choose to do. If there is a price, this I choose to pay. If it is my death, then I choose to die. Where this takes me, there I choose to go. I choose. This I choose to do.”
It wasn’t a spell, except in her own head, but if you couldn’t make spells work in your own head, you couldn’t make them work at all.

– this I choose to do |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

The important thing was –
But there were lots of important things. It was important to look calm and confident, it was important to keep your mind clear, it was important not to show how pants-wettingly scared you were…

– the important thing |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

She put on the heavy brown woolen cloak that Miss Treason had made for her and grabbed the black pointy hat that hung on the back of the farmhouse door. There was a sort of communal grunt from the people who’d crowded into the kitchen, and some of them backed away. We want a witch now, we need a witch now, but – we’ll back away now, too.

– double-edged |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

This wasn’t normal weather even for midwinter, and this was springtime. It was a challenge. Or perhaps it was just a game. It was hard to tell, with the Wintersmith.
Only it can’t be a game because the lambs are dying. I’m only just thirteen, and my father, and a lot of other people older than me, want me to do something. And I can’t. The Wintersmith has found me again. He is here now, and I’m too weak.
It would be easier if they were bullying me, but no, they’re begging. My father’s face is grey with worry and he’s begging. My father is begging me.
Oh no, he’s taking his hat off. He’s taking off his hat to speak to me!
They think magic comes free when I snap my fingers. But if I can’t do this for them, now, what good am I? I can’t let them see I’m afraid. Witches aren’t allowed to be afraid.
And this is my fault. I: I started all this. I must finish it.

– on responsibility |
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

A very small but very angry blue face, with the lump of snow still balanced on top of it, looked out at the sudden white wilderness.
“Ach, crivens!” it grumbled. “Will ye no’ look at this? ‘Tis the work o’ the Wintersmith! Noo there’s a scunner that willna tak’ ‘no’ fra’ an answer!”
Other lumps of snow were pushed up. More heads peered out.
“Oh waily, waily, waily!” said one of them. “He’s found the big wee hag again!”
The first head turned toward this head, and said, “Daft Wullie?”
“Yes, Rob?”
“Did I no’ tell ye to lay off that waily business?”
“Aye, Rob, ye did that,” said the head addressed as Daft Wullie.
“So why did ye just do it?”
“Sorry, Rob. It kinda bursted oot.”
“It’s so dispiritin’.”
“Sorry, Rob.”

– the Feegles, on (in) the snow | Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

When the storm came, it hit the hills like a hammer. No sky should hold as much snow as this, and because no sky could, the snow fell, fell in a wall of white. 

– the snow | Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Regular

terrypratchettparadise:

“In the kitchen, chickens had overflowed into the sink. They weren’t making much noise, except for the occasional ‘werk’ a chicken makes when it’s a bit uncertain about things, which is more or less all the time.”

– Terry Pratchett – Wintersmith

Regular

terrypratchettappreciation:

“They avoided one another’s faces, for fear of what they might see mirrored there. Each man thought: one of the others is bound to say something soon, some protest, and then I’ll murmur agreement, not actually say anything, I’m not stupid as that, but definitely murmur very firmly, so that the others will be in no doubt that I thoroughly disapprove, because at a time like this it behooves all decent men to nearly stand up and be almost heard… No one said anything. The cowards, thought each man.”

— Guards! Guards! by Terry Pratchett
(via belewitts)