Category: granny weatherwax

Regular

jmbrett:

“Cottages tend to attract similar kinds of witches. It’s natural.
Every witch trains up one or two young witches in their life, and when
in the course of mortal time the cottage becomes vacant it’s only sense
for one of them to move in.

“Magrat’s cottage traditionally housed
thoughtful witches who noticed things and wrote things down. Which herbs
were better than others for headaches, fragments of old stories, odds
and ends like that.

“There were a dozen books of tiny handwriting and
drawings, the occasional interesting flower or unusual frog pressed
carefully between the pages.

“It was a cottage of questioning witches, research witches. Eye of what newt? What species of ravined salt-sea shark? It’s all very well a potion calling for Love-in-idleness, but which of the thirty-seven common plants called by that name in various parts of the continent was actually meant?

“The reason that Granny Weatherwax was a better witch than Magrat was that she knew that in witchcraft it didn’t matter a damn which one it was, or even if it was a piece of grass.

The reason Magrat was a better doctor than Granny was that she thought it did.”

–Terry Pratchett,
Lords and Ladies

Regular

“"Typical artist,’ said Granny. ‘He just painted the showy stuff in the front… And what about these cherubs? We’re not going to get them too, are we? I don’t like to see little babies flying through the air.’

‘They turn up in a lot of old paintings,’ said Nanny Ogg. ‘They put them in to show it’s Art and not just naughty pictures of ladies with not many clothes on.’

"Well, they’re not fooling ME,” said Granny Weatherwax.“

– Terry Pratchett – Wintersmith

Regular

“Mrs. Earwig (pronounced Ar-wige, at least by Mrs. Earwig) believed in shiny wands, and magical amulets and mystic runes and the power of the stars, while Granny Weatherwax in cups of tea, dry biscuits, washing every morning in cold water and, well…mostly she believed in Granny Weatherwax.”

– Terry Pratchett – Wintersmith

Regular

“Blessings be upon this house,’ said Granny, but in a voice that suggested that if blessings needed to be taken away, she could do that, too.”

– Terry Pratchett – Wintersmith

Regular

“"And what do you really do?” asked Tiffany. The thin witch hesitatied for a moment, and then: “We look to … the edges,” said Mistress Weatherwax. “There’s a lot of edges, more than people know. Between life and death, this world and the next, night and day, right and wrong … an’ they need watchin’. We watch ‘em, we guard the sum of things. And we never ask for any reward. That’s important.”“

– Terry Pratchett – The Wee Free Men

Regular

Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg left Goatberger’s office and walked
demurely down the street. At least, Granny walked demurely. Nanny leaned
somewhat.
Every thirty seconds she’d say, “How much was that again?”
“Three thousand, two hundred and seventy dollars and eighty-seven pence,” said Granny. She was looking thoughtful.
“I
thought it was nice of him to look in all the ashtrays for all the odd
coppers he could round up,” said Nanny. “Those he could reach, anyway.
How much was that again?”
“Three thousand, two hundred and seventy dollars and eighty-seven pence.”
“I’ve never had seventy dollars before,” said Nanny.
“I didn’t say just seventy dollars, I said–”
“Yes, I know. But I’m working my way up to it gradual.”

– Terry Pratchett, Maskerade

Regular

“I’m clever enough to know how you manage not to think of a pink rhinoceros if someone says ‘pink rhinoceros,’” she managed to say aloud.
“Ah, that’s deep magic, that is,” said Granny Weatherwax.
“No. It’s not. You don’t know what a rhinoceros looks like, do you?”
Sunlight filled the clearing as the old witch laughed, as clear as a downland stream.
“That’s right!” she said.

– on pink rhinoceroses |
Terry Pratchett, A Hat Full Of Sky

Regular

There were no secrets from Granny Weatherwax. Whatever you said, she watched what you meant.

– on Granny |
Terry Pratchett, A Hat Full Of Sky

Regular

The old woman slowly unwrapped the white paper. The Zephyr Billow cloak unrolled itself under her fingers and filled the air like smoke.
“It’s lovely, but I couldn’t wear it,” said Tiffany as the cloak shaped itself over the gentle currents of the clearing. “You need gravitas to carry off a cloak like that.”
“What’s gravitarse?” said Granny Weatherwax sharply.
“Oh… dignity. Seniority. Wisdom. Those shorts of things,” said Tiffany.
“Ah,” said Granny Weatherwax, relaxing a little. She stared at the gently rippling cloak and sniffed. It really was a wonderful creation. The wizards had got at least one thing right when they had made it. It was one of those things that fill a hole in your life that you didn’t know was there until you’d seen it.

– on nice things |
Terry Pratchett, A Hat Full Of Sky

Regular

“You understand, then, that all the glittery stuff is just toys, and toys can lead you astray?”
“Yes!”
“Then take off that shiny horse you wear around your neck, girl, and drop it in the well.”
Obediently, half hypnotized by the voice, Tiffany reached behind her neck and undid the clasp.
The pieces of the silver Horse shone as she held it over the water.
She stared at it as if she was seeing it for the first time. And then…
She tests people, she thought. All the time.
“Well?” said the old witch.
“No,” said Tiffany. “I can’t.”
“Can’t or won’t?” said Granny sharply.
“Can’t,” said Tiffany and stuck out her chin. “And won’t!”
She drew her hand back and refastened the necklace glaring defiantly at Granny Weatherwax.
The witch smiled.
“Well done,” she said quietly. If you don’t know when to be a human being, you don’t know when to be a witch. And if you’re too afraid of goin’ astray, you won’t go anywhere.”

– on when to be human |
Terry Pratchett, A Hat Full Of Sky